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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
. two years ago a fruit vendor in 2 nietzsche -- in tunisia set himself on fire, starting the arab spring. thousands took to the streets to protest against the killings, and the prime minister has responded, promising he would form a new government. >> he who is the country's first political assassination since the revolution, and it has exposed intrenched divisions and powerful and distrust. crowds of opposition supporters gathered at the interior ministry and tried to storm the building. they blamed the islamist-led government. these are the streets where protests brought down the dictatorship two years ago. eyewitnesses say when the police responded there was panic and chaos. >> police tried to absorb the anger of the demonstrators, but they could not just watch people throwing stones at them. >> he was the leader of a small party and a fierce critic of the largest party in the government coalition. he was shot dead by a man on a motorbike as he left home. he denounced it as an act of terror. it is unlikely to satisfy the dead man's supporters, who say he received repeated death
zero years since tunisia celebrates the transparent election, the first since the uprising of 2011. that election made to miyisha somewhat of a beacon -- made tunisia somewhat of a beacon. the islamist party merged, but without a majority. they promised cooperation. it seemed to nietzsche -- tunisia was finding a way to compromise. will today's assassination derails the emerging democracy? >> this is the most difficult process of the change, and the new political system has been put together. the new constitution, the divisions between where the country is going, the maneuvering, but generally things are heading in the right direction. >> even so, this will put fear into the heart of the political lives. tonight they called elections. it is a reminder that even the most hopeful of arab democracies remains a work in progress. >> i spoke to michelle. she is the director of the council at the middle east center. we have one of the country's best his the most -- countries that is the most westernized is the most stable. it is a surprise? >> assassination has not been a feature of the t
>> more protester underway in tunisia -- protests are underway in tunisia. the other stories on al jazeera, as french forces in mali push north towards algeria, violence erupts in the capital. >> i am in brussels. after talks lasting through the night, we now have a draft proposal for the eu budget. many more hours ahead before a deal is finally done. >> nasa's curiosity rover gets down to work on the red planet. thousands of tunisians are gathering in their capital for the from -- funeral of a prominent opposition leader. shape -- shokri belaid was shot in front of his home. he was one of the government's fiercest critics. some are putting the blame on the ruling party. hashemi behar a -- hashem able horror -- haitian -- hashem ahelbarra is live with more. >> there are protests across the country and symbolic ceremonies paying tribute to the opposition leader. we are expecting the funeral to start anytime soon. the procession will be in the capital where he will be laid to rest. people are concerned about potential clashes with supporters of the government and supporters of the op
television in america and around the globe. two years ago a fruit vendor in 2 nietzsche -- in tunisia set himself on fire, starting the arab spring. thousands took to the streets to protest against the killings, and the prime minister has responded, promising he would form a new government. >> he who is the country's first political assassination since the revolution, and it has exposed intrenched divisions and powerful and distrust. crowds of opposition supporters gathered at the interior ministry and tried to storm the building. they blamed the islamist-led government. these are the streets where protests brought down the dictatorship two years ago. eyewitnesses say when the police responded there was panic and chaos. >> police tried to absorb the anger of the demonstrators, but they could not just watch people throwing stones at them. >> he was the leader of a small party and a fierce critic of the largest party in the government coalition. he was shot dead by a man on a motorbike as he left home. he denounced it as an act of terror. it is unlikely to satisfy the dead man's supporters,
, for the last of those years, country director for morocco and tunisia. earlier in his career, did quite a bit of work which we will see john out, up in northern mali. very delighted to have him on our team at the africa center, as well as as a friend. also delighted to have another ,ld friend, dr. ricardo renÉ dr. of science at binghamton university on islam. he has been a colleague, i might mention that he and i are editing a book together on the north african revolutions. delighted to have him as a scholar of the region and a friend and our wives have become friends as well. it is in the family, so to speak. last but not least, this dr. is a political scientist and senior fellow at the middle east program of the carnegie endowment. and author of quite a number of works, some quite prescient in their timing on al qaeda. you have their biographical notes for fuller details. one thing not in the notes, i cannot resist mentioning that while there are few discussions of the crisis in mali going around washington, this will be the only one where the panel speakers includes individuals who have b
and that of former secretary of state hillary clinton. >> they insisted that the tunisia authorities did not have the evidence to keep him in custody. >> tunisias did not have a basis in their law to hold him. >> so they released him? >> they did. >> where is he? >> still in tunisia. >> it doesn't sound like a good system to work with partners. >> they work the way we do. >> f.b.i. interviewed him for two hours in december after weeks of delay and following the personal intervention of the republican senator lindsey graham. he seemed to minimize the suspect's release. claiming the u.s. case was weak. >> we didn't have anything on him either or we would have made point to tunisias to turn him over to us. >> two weeks earlier in the benghazi hearing, secretary clinton said she spoke with mueller about whether the government's case could be made public. >> director mueller and i spoke about this at some length. there was not an ability for evidence to be presented yet that was cape to believe be presented in open court. >> clinton said the tunisians promised to keep tabs on him. >> we have been assu
is on edge today. riot police in egypt and tunisia, bracing for more violence. protests have been happening there as you can see after friday prayers following the assassination after popular opposition leader in tunisia. remember, that was the birthplace of the arab spring two years ago. fox's's conor powell is live from jerusalem. conor, do we know why this tunisian opposition leader was murdered? >> reporter: he was an outspoken critic of the ruling muslim brotherhood party in tunisia. he was a leading figure in the arab spring revolution two years ago. on wednesday he was gunned down by an unknown assailant in front of his house. recently a muslim cleric in tunisia called for a -- his supporters turned out in thousands for his death. blamed the ruling muslim government for his death. although the tunisia prime minister denies it. he promised a full investigation and to catch those responsible for the murder. alisyn: do we have answer wlormt this assassination will spark more violence? >> reporter: we've already seen three days of violence and protest in tunisia and clashes with the poli
director in the office of the secretary of defense, and also country director for morocco and tunisia, and earlier in his career, did quite a bit of work, which i think you'll see brought out up 234 -- in northern mali including 30 trips in that region. ranging well, and delighted to have him on our team. another old friend, dr. ricardo, professor of political science and sociology and a corporation scholar on islam, ricardo, a good friend and colleague, and in the department of shameless self-promotion, i mentioned he and i are editing a book together in the north african revolution, but delighted to have him, and our wives have become friends as well. it's in the family so to speak. timely, last, but not least, dr. onwar, assistant professor of political science, and nonresident senior fellow at the carnegie endowment, and author of quite a number of works, some quite precious in their timing on al-qaeda in the islamic and its effects. you have their bigraphical notes for fuller details. i would note one thing not in the notes, and i can't resist mentioning that while there's few di
, bathed in tunisia, snorkled in sinai and danced in israeli discos. in libya i played tennis with the daughter of his libyan tennis coach, learned about medical school in libya and jogged through the ruins. but, as we said, chris always came home and entertained us when he did. i worked hard to sharpen tennis and skiiing skills. i was proud the year chris said you ski faster than the master. [ laughter] >> we got up early to be the first on the ski lift. at my wedding he said he would be happy by to perform a libyan liberation dance to celebrate the success of the revolution. [ laughter] >> he inspired me to travel and work inter nationally. i filled out an application for the peace corp. during my senior year because he had. he taught english in morocco. i taught math. we talked about the joys of living and working over seas. we spoke french together. later he helped me get an assignment with a pediatric a.i.d.s. group. now i work in a county hospital in stockton caring for patients from all over the world. like chris, i am genuinely interested in listening to their stories
. america finding itself on the sidelines. we are on the sidelines in egypt, tunisia, libya. we cannot pick who is going to be the winner. we can be there with help, with aid, should be there more. we could help with education and the things that america does best. to try and trick the metal is as if we can pick the winners and put them at the top, -- middle east as if we can pick the winners and put them at the top will be a disservice of america. we will not get the people we want on top. that is what we are seeing today. people that have not been close to america. they will find a way to build it that her society for themselves. america cannot choose george washington for somebody else. the syrians will have to find their own george washington. that will come out of this maelstrom of national revolution. they will find their leader that will lead them towards a better future and hopefully a democratic future. >> five sentences. >> i am not sure how to conclude. for the last 20 years, we have been not succeeding in warmaking or peacemaking in this region. the frame of reference is that --
in senate. the other is the suspect in the benghazi attack held in tunisia. thigh shared information and intelligence on what we had. the united states government try repeatedly to get access and interviewed him for three hours. brennan testified under oath that the united states didn't have anything on him. brennan's chents weren't true. republicans understand they weren't true. they couldn't be true because we passed information to the allied governments in order to help us try to prosecute. so brennan has to reconcile the comments. he has been asked in a letter by rubio to clarify them. he hasn't yet. they will push him to do so. >> bret: is this standoff over hagel increase the chances that more information comes out? or does this get as the president says, blown away by charges that this is politically motivated? and republicans are just looking for things to grab on to? >> i don't think the hague hague standoff makes any difference. >> bret: a lot of it is based on the benghazi -- >> i understand. but i'm saying the standoff over hagel is more related to request for information
democracies across the world from libya, tunisia, and beyond. it is in our mutual interest. i want to thank the president for the important leadership. showing the support for libya. i think he and the people of the united kingdom can be proud. william and i agreed that the syrian people deserve better than the horrific violence that threatens the everyday lives of innocent people, people wanting their government to be accountable and part of their own lives. the regime has rained down rockets, and that is just the latest example of brutality. we condemn this indiscriminate killing of innocent civilians and we condemn it in the strongest terms. it is just further evidence assad has to go. i think william for the effort to help dial up the pressure on the regime, for their contributions of humanitarian aid and hosting the transition conference last month. let me make clear that we will continue to work closely with british allies to address the growing humanitarian crisis and the support of the syrian opposition council. we are coordinating with the syrian opposition coalition, coordinating
of thousands have taken to the streets in tunisia for the barrel -- burial procession of an opposition leader assassinated earlier this week. a political crisis has been mounting since the murder of chokri belaid, a leading human rights advocate and outspoken critic of the islamist-led government. and it's the turmoil on wednesday, the prime minister proposed to dissolve parliament and form a government but the ruling islamist party has rejected the prime minister's bid. in iraq, a series of explosions across the country have killed at least 31 people with dozen others wounded. today marks the seventh consecutive friday when bombings have taken place in iraq amidst rising sectarian tensions ahead of the april elections. u.s. news outlets are facing criticism after it was revealed they complied with an obama administration request to hide the location of a secret u.s. drone base in saudi arabia. the base was first used in 2011 to kill muslim cleric and u.s. citizen anwar al awlaki. the paper discusses location of the first time this week, reportedly because the base's architect, john brennan,
urged leaders in egypt tunisia and libya to recognize women as equal citizens with important contributions to make. we are supporting women entrepreneurs around the world who are creating jobs and driving growth. so. so technology, development, human rights, women. now i know that a lot of pundits hear that and they say, could isn't that all a bit soft? what about the hard stuff? will, that is a false choice. we need both and no one should think otherwise. i will be the first to stand up and proclaim loudly and clearly that america's military might is and must remain the greatest fighting force in the history of the world. i will also make very clear as i have done over the last year's, that our diplomatic power, the ability to convene, our moral suasion is effective because united states can back up our words with action. we will ensure freedom of navigation in all the world sees. 's seas. we will relentlessly go after al qaeda convicts affiliates and its wannabes. we will do what is necessary to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. there are limits to what soft pow
in places like liberia. we have urged leaders of egypt tunisia and libya to recognize women as equal citizens with important contributions to make. we are supporting women entrepreneurs around the world and it would creating jobs in driving growth. said technology, development, human rights and women. i know that a lot of pundits are that list and they say isn't that all soft? what about the hard stuff? will, that is a false choice. we need both. and no one should think otherwise. i will be the first to stand up and proclaim loudly and clearly that america's military might is and must remain the greatest fighting force in the history of the world. i will also make very clear as i have done over the last year that our diplomatic power needs the ability to convene our moral suasion is effective because united states can back up our words with action. we will ensure freedom of navigation in all the world to see. we will relentlessly go after al qaeda and its affiliates and wannabes. we will do what is necessary to prevent iran from obtaining a nuke their weapon. there are limits to what
america to khartoum, from tunisia to yemen, from egypt to mali and others. while dod does not have the primary responsibility for the security of u.s. diplomatic facilities around the world, we do work closely with the state department and support them as requested. in the months prior to the benghazi attack, as i've said, we had received from the intelligence community almost 300 reports on possible threats to american facilities around the world. over the course of the day on september 11th general dempsey and i received a number of reports of possible threats to u.s. facilities, including those in cairo, egypt, but there were no reports of imminent threats to u.s. personnel or facilities in benghazi. by our best estimate the incident at the temporary mission facility in benghazi began at about 3:42pm eastern daylight time on september 11th. the embassy in tripoli was notified of the attacks almost immediately, and within 17 minutes of the initial reports, about 3:59pm, africom directed an unarmed and unmanned surveillance aircraft that was nearby to reposition overhead the bengh
future attacks being planned by the same people because we never got a chance to talk to him. tunisia said their laws would not let them hold him. that is an excuse we've heard in other pats of the world. that doesn't concern you? >> we press our partners in foreign government to hold individuals and to allow us access to it. sometimes their laws do not allow that to happen. i think the united states government has to respect these governments right to, in fact, enforce their laws appropriately. we don't want to have these individuals being held in some kind of custody that is extra judicial. >> thank you. >> senator warner. >> thank you. thank you mr. brennan, for your testimony today. i think what we've heard from a number of colleagues and we had this discussion when we discussed the committee study. how could be confirmed -- i'm-- how do you ensure that the c.i.a. director is going to be well-informed. particularly to -- we have questioned you about a number of key sensitive programs. the agency is in a lot of these programs that there needs to be some ability to measure objective
and he was also country direct for more rocco and tunisia and earlier in the career did quite a bit of work we'll see brought occupant out in northern mali including the missions and trips among the foray in the region. we're delighted to have him on our team at the africa center as well as as a friend. we're delighted to have another old friend ricardo rene laremont professor of political science and sociology at begin -- he's been a wood friend and colleague and in the department of shameless self-promotion, i might mention that we are editing a book together on the north african revolutions. but delighted to have him. and also a friend and our wives have become friends as well. in the family, so to speak. and finally, last but not least, dr. anouar bokhars is the professor of political science at mcdaniel college and senior fellow at the middle east program at the carnegieen endowment and author quite a number of works. some fresh end in the their timing al qaeda and slam and -- and the effect. so you the biographical notes for their detail. i would note one thing not in the note
but it is an important one. in tunisia as you follow mentioned the support of the regime and need to go away but they need to be reconstituted in such a way that they serve a democratic state. we need to engage that question if we determine that that is in our interests. we have a failed state. it isn't the subject of a grand policy debate in the country because it seems too far away. but don't pay attention to the problem long enough and see what happens. it will be much less costly for us now to invest in a modest way to reconstitute the bases -- yellowing paper ongoing system to get intimate questions with poverty iain dhaka, and then of course the call continuing in this are a we have to then think about nigeria, northern nigeria. of the are to drive and for today's juan him to drive is another. there's only four days of traveling and its very, very important for us analysts to stop thinking from the national perspective s and start thinking from the regional perspectives. that is the only way that we are going to comprehend the dynamics appear of the challenges that are in front of us a
diplomatic staff in advance of a crisis, from central america to khartoum, from tunisia to yemen, from egypt and mali to and eyes. while dod does not have the primary responsibility for the security of u.s. diplomatic facilities around the world, we do work closely with the state department and support them as requested. in the months prior to the benghazi attack, as i said, we had received from the intelligence community, almost 300 reports on upon threats to american facilities around the world. over the course of the day on september 11th, general dempsey and i received a number of reports of possible threats to u.s. facilities. including those in cairo, egypt. but there are no reports of imminent threats to u.s. personnel or facilities in benghazi. by our best estimate, the incident at the temporary mission facility in benghazi began at about 3:42 p.m., eastern daylight time, on september 11th. the embassy in tripoli was notified of the attacks almost immediately, and within 1 -- 17 minutes of the initial report, africom directed an unmanned surveillance aircraft that was nearby to repos
in detail to what i perceive as a difficult, the evolving situation in north africa, now with tunisia, with libya, with all these countries, and certainly with mali, and how you plan to direct the agency to deal with this devolving momentum that is taking place in northern africa. so that will be for tuesday, and at the request of senator levin, i ask unanimous consent to add into the record a joint statement that he and i may, on april 27, 2012, and, secondly, in order to have mr. brennan's answers to questions for the record by the time he returns before us in closed session, i ask members to the right questions for the record by 5:00 p.m. tomorrow. that is friday, february 8, so we have them for you as soon as we i want to thank you and your family for being here. i wish you well. thank you and the hearing is adjourned. >> thank you. >> john brennan has the counterterrorism advisory for your years and now nominate background the president to be the c.i.a. director. we're wrapping up four hours of testimony. we're opening up the phone lines to find out about the issues discussed and
throughout in the world and not all, obviously are benghazi or tripoli or tunisia. the reality is that in most countries, in the world, we can rely on the host country to provide security. they're there. they're willing to do it. they do a good job. there are some of these embassies in some of these more volatile countries that are of concern. and those were the nineteen that we're designated by the state department as ones we had to look at more closely and develop a better approach to providing security. because there part of the problem is the host countries are not very good at providing that kind of security. >> is there a -- it seems this is so much of a distance in time challenge that when it happens, how quickly can we respond? how far away are we? is there a almost like a playbook for the ambassadors for the people in those facilities that here's the steps to follow. jump on them immediately if it dpunlt click we go this or that? >> the best playbook the general responded this as well. the best playbook is an ambassador who says, we have got serious security problems h
, to tunisia, from egypt to mali and others. while d.o.d. does not have primary responsibility for the security of u.s. diplomatic facilities around the world, we do work closely with the state department and support them as requested. in the months prior to the benghazi attack, as i've said, we had received from the intelligence community almost 300 reports on possible threats to american facilities around the world. over the course of the day on september 11, general dempsey and i received a number of reports of possible threats to u.s. facilities, including those in cairo, egypt, but there were no reports of imminent threats to u.s. personnel or facilities in benghazi. by our best estimate, the incident at the temporary mission facility in benghazi began at about 3:42 p.m. eastern daylight time on september 11. the embassy in tripoli was notified of the attacks almost immediately, and within 17 minutes of the initial reports, about 3:59 p.m., africom directed an unmanned, unmanned surveillance aircraft that was nearby to reposition overhead the benghazi facility. it was focused on the primar
of change in north africa and the middle east, some of those countries, such as egypt, libya and tunisia, are more susceptible to extremism and radicalisation. were these countries discussed and was any action proposed? >> i thank my honorable friend for his support. as i said earlier, there was a discussion specifically about mali, but there is more to be done to support democracy and the building blocks of democracy in countries such as egypt and libya. the eu, with its partnership and neighbourhood funds, has a role to play there. >> has my right honorable friend received an apology from the shadow chancellor, who, as we were reminded, said in the chamber last october that the government had failed to build the alliances needed to deliver a real-terms eu budget cut? >> i am not sure the shadow chancellor really does apologies, but it has been great to be cheered to the echo by him during today's statement. i will not expect it every time, but it has been a pleasure. >> as a business owner, when negotiating with suppliers i was always able to drive down costs when there was a clear alt
concerning nuclear weapons, libya, mali, tunisia and egypt are in various states of unrest which we have no strategy. we are the most unsettled period since the end of the cold war. i have serious concerns as to the quality of senator hagel's professional judgment in the acuity of his views on critical areas of national security including security in the east asia and the middle east. his record on iraq is particularly troubling. as i alluded a moment ago in 2002 he voted to authorize the use of force against iraq. by 2006, the support for the war diminished after republican losses in the 2006 midterm elections. he wrote an opinion piece for "the washington post" under the title "leaving iraq honorable "foreforeshadowing. and president bush announced the decision to surge troops in 2007, senator hagel actively campaigned against it. he voted in february of 2007, in favor of a bill expressing opposition to the surge and in favor of measures to troops from iraq and equally bad policy. he wrote in the 2008 memoir, america our next chapter in historically show that the legislative efforts to
or withdraw diplomatic staff in the advance of a crisis, from central america, from car whom, to tunisia, from egypt to mali and others. while d.o.d. does not have primary responsibility for the security of u.s. diplomatic facilities around the world, we do work closely with the state department and support them as requested. in the months prior to the benghazi attack, as i've said, we had received from the intelligence community almost 300 reports on possible threats to american facilities around the world. over the course of the day on september 11, general dempsey and i received a number of reports of possible threats to u.s. facilities, including those in cairo, egypt, but there were no reports of imminent threats to u.s. personnel or facilities in benghazi. my -- by our best estimate, the incident at the temporary mission facility in benghazi began at about 3:42 p.m. eastern daylight time on september 11. the embassy in tripoli was notified of the attacks almost immediately, and within 17 minutes of the initial reports, about 3:59 p.m., africom directed an unmanned, unmanned surveillance
there in the world and not all are benghazi or tripoli or tunisia. the reality is in most countries in the world we can rely on the host country to provide security. they are there and willing to do it and they do a good job. there are some of these embassies in some of these more volatile countries that are of concern and those are the 19 that were designated by the state department as ones we had to look at more closely and then try to develop a better approach to providing security, because there, part of the problem is the host countries are not very good in providing that kind of security. >> is there a -- it seems there is so much of a distance and time challenge that when it happens, how quickly can we respond, how far away are we. is there almost like a playbook for ambassadors for the people in those facilities that here's the steps to follow, jump on these immediately. if this doesn't click, we go to this, if this doesn't click, we go to that. >> the best playbook, the best playbook is an ambassador who says we've got serious security problems here. we are threatened and therefore we need
with teargas canisters are battling these protesters that have erupted in the capital of tunisia. after a brief calm overnight, it's the second day of protest after a popular leader was gunned down yesterday. no one has claimed responsibility for that attack. late yet, the prime minister called for new elections. >>> and the federal reserve is admitting that it has been hacked. phone numbers and other information has been stolen and published. a fed spokesman said hackers exploited, rather, a quote temporary vulnerability that has been fixed. the hacker group anonymous has claimed responsibility for that attack. >>> and japan's military scrambles combat jets after two russian jets entered their air space. they left a minute later without incident. russia denies the charge. the jets were near islands disputed since world war ii and it's the second dispute for japan after accusing china of putting a radar lock on one of its vessels in the east china sea. we reported on that yesterday. >> we'll see what happens on the third day tomorrow. thank you for that report. >>> we're looking into some myste
as a difficult, the evolving situation in north africa, now with tunisia, with libya, with all these countries, and certainly with mali, and how you plan to direct the agency to deal with this evolving momentum that is taking place in northern africa. so that will be for tuesday, and at the request of senator levin, i ask for unanimous consent to add into the record a joint statement that he and i made on april 27, 2012, and, secondly, in order to have mr. brennan's answers to questions for the record by the time he returns before us in closed session, i ask members provide questions for the record by 5:00 p.m. tomorrow. that is friday, february 8, so we have them for you as soon as possible. so that you can respond to them. i want to thank you and your family for being here. i wish you well. thank you and the hearing is adjourned. >> thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> we will bring you the farewell ceremony for leon panetta. president obama is expected to speak at that event. live coverage begins at 3:
libya, tunisia, and beyond. it is in our mutual interest. i want to thank the president for the important leadership. showing the support for libya. i think he and the people of the united kingdom can be proud. william and i agreed that the syrian people deserve better than the horrific violence that threatens the everyday lives of innocent people, people wanting their government to be accountable and part of their own lives. the regime has rained down rockets, and that is just the latest example of brutality. we condemn this indiscriminate killing of innocent civilians and we condemn it in the strongest terms. it is just further evidence assad has to go. i think william for the effort to help dial up the pressure on the regime, for their contributions of humanitarian aid and hosting the transition conference last month. let me make clear that we will continue to work closely with british allies to address the growing humanitarian crisis and the support of the syrian opposition council. we are coordinating with the syrian opposition coalition, coordinating with the un an
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)